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Review: Fallout 76

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I found myself thinking about Chinese Democracy a lot as I slogged through Fallout 76. Remember Chinese Democracy? It was that long-awaited Guns n' Roses album that many assumed would never actually release. Years after the heyday of GnR -- decades after Appetite for Destruction and Use Your Illusion I and II, and long after Slash, Duff, and Matt were gone -- Axl finally got his shit together and released Chinese Democracy.

It sucked. Critics mostly panned it, and GnR fans disparaged it even harder. It was not a good album, but, more importantly, it wasn't what people who loved GnR wanted to hear or were used to hearing. An artist's current works will always be compared against the standard of their past works. That's an inescapable inevitability of the way we process quality.

Fallout 76 is the Chinese Democracy of video games. It's subpar in most ways, but it'll forever carry the burden of being egregiously offensive to anyone who claimed to adore Fallout in the first place. Fallout fans will wistfully remember the old times, much like GnR fans, and wonder if another Fallout title will ever recapture those good memories -- because Bethesda has clearly forgotten what made those games special.

At least Chinese Democracy never locked up your CD player, forcing you to turn your car off and on again before continuing down the road.

Review: Fallout 76 screenshot

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theprawn
13 days ago
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Deetructoid is kinda bullshit and I've been meaning to unsubscribe for years. This drives it home. Are there any GREAT video games blogs?
tingham
12 days ago
VG247 has a few gems now and again.
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The Moon Is Flipped Upside Down in the Southern Hemisphere

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How old were you when you learned that the Moon in the Southern Hemisphere is upside down? I was today years old…this is my head exploding —> %@*&!$. Ok, the Moon isn’t upside down (that’s Northern-ist) but its orientation changes depending on if you’re north or south of the equator.

Moon Flipped

“From our perspective, the Moon and the night sky is actually rotated 180 degrees compared to our Northern Hemispherical friends,” Jake Clark, an astronomer from the University of Southern Queensland in Australia, explained to ScienceAlert.

“In the south we see the Moon’s dark ‘Oceanus Procellarum’ sea in the south-east corner compared to in the north-west corner for a northern observer.”

But why does it look like this? Well, because physically, we’re actually upside down compared to someone standing in the opposite hemisphere.

That makes perfect sense & the explanation is quite simple but it’s still messing with my head. How did I not know this? Here’s how the Moon appears in the Northern Hemisphere (from Wikipedia):

Moon Flipped North

And here’s a photo from Brendan Keene in Australia:

Moon Flipped South

Tags: Earth   Moon   space
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theprawn
17 days ago
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popular
19 days ago
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7 public comments
llucax
17 days ago
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And how does it looks from the equator? Why people is always discriminating Ecuadorians?
Berlin
StunGod
17 days ago
I think that as you get closer to the equator, the moon takes a more elevated path across the sky. The farther north or south you travel, the lower in the sky the Moon is, since it orbits over the equator. I'm at about 45 degrees north, so there's always a "top" and "bottom" to the moon because it never goes right overhead. It moves sideways in an arc in the southern sky. At the equator, it still moves sideways, but goes directly overhead so there's no strong visual indication of what pole is top or bottom.
roblatham
18 days ago
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How have I never considered this before?
dukeofwulf
19 days ago
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Explain that, Flat Earthers.
mareino
19 days ago
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HOW FAST DO I HAVE TO FLY TO SEE IT FLIP
Washington, District of Columbia
StunGod
19 days ago
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Yep, I'm in this camp too. Today years old, just learning this incredibly obvious thing.
Portland, Oregon, USA, Earth
iwhitney
21 days ago
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What? I was In Australia and I did not know this.
Minneapolis, MN
deezil
21 days ago
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I TOO WAS TODAY YEARS OLD.
Louisville, Kentucky

Pocket Casts 7

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Pocket Casts 7

ZOMG. It's here. Release day is here! We couldn't be prouder, happier or more thrilled to share all the details of Version 7 with you today. It’s a funny thing to work on a big update for so long, you see the app change, you see it grow, you see it evolve but you have to keep it all under wraps! Well not anymore, let the reveal commence!

So what's new? One of the first things you'll notice is that you can now browse podcast series and play episodes in a natural and seamless way. No more needing to subscribe before you can see the content. Open our brand-new Discover section, find something you like and just hit play!

Pocket Casts 7

What if you're looking for that one elusive guest or topic in the podcast? Do you have to scroll through hundreds of episodes to find it? Of course not! Version 7 has you covered there as well. You can now search through a podcast series to find the exact episode you're after.

Pocket Casts 7

Now you're set. You've found shows you love. You've queued up episodes to listen to using the Up Next feature, but you've left the bus and you're at work. Your pesky boss doesn't want to see your headphones plugged into your phone, so you fire up the new web version on your work PC. You look down at the player, and look at that, your Up Next list is now synced! Ditto when you get home and want to chill out with your tablet. Your Up Next list is now synced across all the devices on which you can sign into Pocket Casts (iOS, Android, Web, Mac, PC).

Pocket Casts 7

Weeks later you've discovered so many amazing new episodes that you want to share them with your friends. But what did you listen to last Wednesday? Good news: Version 7 introduces Listening History. All your episodes in the order you played them in, and there's that episode you fell in love with on Wednesday. Two taps later you've shared it with everyone. They'll soon be tired of hearing about how amazing podcasts are and what good taste you have, but hey, we're not relationship counsellors and they're clearly misguided, so on we go!

Pocket Casts 7

We’ve also made significant improvements to help you manage your lists of podcasts. Version 7 introduces a powerful new Archive feature that allows you to archive an episode without changing its play status, so you can archive to your heart’s content and still easily determine if you’ve played an episode.

Those are just five of the improvements in Version 7, and there's so much more. A new streamlined interface makes more features accessible at the tap of a finger. Cumbersome side navigation is replaced with a tab bar, tailored for big phones where reaching the top is sometimes a monumental effort. Settings previously hidden behind menus are now far easier to find and use. Refined Light, Dark and a new Extra Dark theme are there so you can tailor the app to your mood. We've also added season and episode numbering support to help you see exactly where you are in a show. There are many more platform-specific enhancements too: AirPlay 2, playback effects while streaming, and Siri Shortcuts on the iOS side. Mac and PC support on the desktop side. The Android app has been updated based on our work with Google on new Material Design guidelines. We've also spent a lot of time on the server components that power Pocket Casts which will enable some even more interesting things in the future.

Version 7 is available now on the following platforms:

We think you're going to love all the new changes, and as always, we'd love your feedback!

press release | press kit

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theprawn
27 days ago
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Holy hell I hate this. I normally love software updates, I disable auto-updates because I don't want to miss an update. . . but this, I don't recognize this app. Pocket Casts is my most used app, part of my daily routine, and this is a whole other app. How the fuck do you mark something as played and what is archived?
ChrisDL
27 days ago
might i recommend overcast, it has treated me very well.
DMack
28 days ago
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Victoria, BC
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Stan Lee Was Many Wonderful Things—So Please Stop Calling Him “Creator” of Marvel

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Stan Lee’s death at 95 wasn’t a shock, but it was still a knife to the heart of anyone who loves Marvel Comics, the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Netflix’s Marvel series, Spider-Man underoos, or any of the other zillions of products spawned by characters such as the Fantastic Four, Iron Man, and the X-Men.

But one of the words frequently used to describe Lee reflects misinformation about what the legend did and didn’t do back in the Marvel heyday of the 1960s. In death as in life, Lee gets too much credit for creating and not enough credit for all the other important jobs he did on behalf of Marvel and geek culture in general.

In sum, you can call Lee plenty of things—editor, publisher, scripter, plotter, celebrity, huckster, and cameo machine—but for the love of the dread Dormammu, don’t call him creator.

Creator, with its godlike connotations, suggests a harmful lie about the genesis of the Marvel Universe that has been debunked for decades, and will probably continue being debunked until a real-life Galactus eats our planet. For most of its history, Marvel Comics—with Lee’s participation—portrayed “the Man” as the primary creator of the Marvel Universe, but the truth is that most of the work of creation was done by the artist/storytellers, especially Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko.

Necessity was the mother of inequality. After the success of The Fantastic Four in 1961 led to The Hulk, The X-Men, Daredevil, The Avengers, Spider-Man, and others, Lee had more comics to write than even a superhuman could script. Enter “Marvel style.”

With Marvel style, the “writer” of a comic would suggest a plot, leaving the artist (usually Ditko or Kirby) to develop the plot, craft the art, and often suggest dialogue. Then Lee would return to fill in the word balloons. The reality of the workload was that the artist was making most of the storytelling decisions. They weren’t illustrating a pre-existing, detailed script, as most comic-book artists do today. (Although those artists obviously deserve credit as well. As comic-book artist Declan Shalvey has argued: “After all, drawing is creating too.”)

By the end of the ’60s, Ditko and Kirby had both left Marvel out of frustration with the situation. Lee became a pop-culture hero and entrenched employee of Marvel, enjoying literal and cultural riches, while the artists who were doing most of the work were treated like hired hands.

But … just because the artists were doing most of the work doesn’t mean they were doing all the work. As Hellboy creator Mike Mignola put it on Twitter: “You can debate forever who really created what—Stan or Jack or Steve—but the truth is it was some magic combination of those guys.” Longtime comics writer J.M. DeMatteis voiced a similar sentiment: “And while we’re raising a glass to Stan, let’s raise a glass to the genius of Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko. Together those three men reshaped our popular culture and fired our collective imagination. ’Nuff Said!

The complexities of the Kirby-Lee collaboration in particular have been pored over for decades. The latest word will come in Stuf’ Said, a special book-sized edition of Jack Kirby Collector. Not even the most ardent Kirbyite or Ditkohead argues that Lee had no part in the genesis and development of Drs. Doom and Strange and the rest. But the facts dictate that calling Lee creator, which implies sole creator, is horseshit. So are these headlines:

Stan Lee, creator of legendary Marvel comic book superheroes, dies at 95
- NBCNews.com

Stan Lee: Spider-Man, X-Men and Avengers creator dies aged 95
- The Guardian

Stan Lee, creator of Spider-Man and Black Panther has died: report
- NOLA.com

Stan Lee dead – Spider-Man and Marvel Comics creator dies aged 95
- The Sun

All of the above could be fixed with the addition of “co-.”

Similarly, the Hollywood Reporter’s obit piece includes this unfortunate passage: “Lee, who began in the business in 1939 and created or co-created Black Panther, Spider-Man, the X-Men, the Mighty Thor, Iron Man, the Fantastic Four, the Incredible Hulk, Daredevil and Ant-Man, among countless other characters …” That “or” is doing a lot of work, because Lee didn’t create any of them. He co-created Spider-Man with Ditko, Daredevil with Bill Everett, and the rest with Kirby. There’s no shame in the word co-creation. It’s the only accurate term.

While making this distinction now might sound to some like spitting on Lee’s grave, the relentless mythology of Lee as the sole genius behind Marvel has constituted an endless, geyser-like expectoration on the graves of Ditko and Kirby. An Onion headline published in the wake of Lee’s death had plenty of truth: “Stan Lee, Creator Of Beloved Marvel Character Stan Lee, Dead At 95.” Lee the character, outside his charming cameos, was not a harmless fiction. Other creators, and their legacies and families, suffered for it.

Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to describe Lee that accurately reflect his monumental impact on comics and pop culture. In addition to being a co-creator of Marvel, he was the longtime editor—a job far less sexy than writer or artist, but kind of important to making sure the damn comics came out at all. As Marvel editor-in-chief, Lee shepherded a marginal comics company from the bottom of the stack to the top of the sales charts, eventually smashing stodgy DC and revolutionizing comics. Many folks (such as myself) are obsessed with the artistic genius of Lee’s collaborators. Their impact might have been much less if Lee hadn’t been such a successful and skilled editor.

But if editor sounds too mundane, there are other, more colorful, terms for the work Lee did to make Marvel, well, marvelous. In his columns in each Marvel issue atop Stan’s Soapbox, Lee’s distinctive vocabulary (“Excelsior!” “’Nuff said!”) and alliterative acumen marked him as a showman, a carnival barker, a hype man, and, to use an obnoxious but accurate term, a brand ambassador. To this day, Stan is Marvel to many people, and his charm and humor are among the reasons why Marvel is beloved. Without Stan’s style, would Marvel have proven such a durable brand? We’ll never know, but I doubt it. There have been many creators with prodigious imaginations in the history of comics, but there’s never been a salesman like Stan Lee.

In the spirit of Stan himself, you can even describe him in bigger terms. The following headlines are accurate and contain no slight to Lee’s collaborators:

Stan Lee, Marvel Comics’ Real-Life Superhero, Dies at 95
- The Hollywood Reporter

Stan Lee Is Dead at 95; Superhero of Marvel Comics
- The New York Times

Stan Lee, Marvel Comic Book Legend, Dies at 95
- Variety

The truth about Stan Lee—a frustrated, middle-aged, would-be novelist who, just when he was ready to quit the business, helped reshape superheroes and pop culture—really is amazing and fantastic. Lee was equally skilled at making the sausage of monthly comics and selling that sausage as sensational (which it often was). His cameos are such a treasure even DC got in on the fun. He truly was a legend and real-life superhero—and a co-creator. That should be enough.



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theprawn
29 days ago
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Married to the Sea

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Married to the Sea

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theprawn
42 days ago
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Dick

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The post Dick appeared first on The Perry Bible Fellowship.

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theprawn
85 days ago
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😳😢😭
fxer
90 days ago
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Bend, Oregon
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