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theprawn
4 days ago
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The Unspoken Reality of Net Neutrality

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Posted by rjonesx.

It's not very often that Moz as a company openly advocates for a particular political position. While we've always supported our employees' choices to be vocal about the issues for which they're passionate and have done our best to live by the TAGFEE values (as imperfect as that attempt may be), we have rarely directed the attention of our customers or our readers toward a particular end. Today, we break with that tradition to join hands with countless organizations across the web in a Day of Action in support of net neutrality.

Net neutrality is a fairly simple principle: that Internet service providers should enable access to all content and applications regardless of the source, and without favoring or blocking particular products or websites.

At face value, net neutrality seems to affirm the basic principles of free speech which most of us hold dear. If the FCC moves forward in retracting policies that protect the Internet in the interest of the public good, it is reasonable to suspect that these freedoms will be curtailed.

This curtailed freedom is often described in terms of small or independent content producers who will be cut out of this new caste-like system of Internet access. However, I would like to take a moment to shed light on different vital services which are likely to suffer without the protections provided by net neutrality.

1. 911 call centers

Over 65 million Americans rely on Voice-Over-IP (VOIP) for their home phone service, and in 2009, the Congressional Research Service called for 911 call centers to migrate to IP technology in modernizing their infrastructure. Both families and the call centers themselves depend on unfettered bandwidth. When you call 911, seconds matter, and the quality of that bandwidth determines that speed. Without net neutrality, that bandwidth and those seconds are put to the highest bidder.

2. Clinical Video Telehealth for our veterans

In 2016, the Department of Veterans Affairs served over 677,000 veterans in rural and under-served areas via telehealth. The VA's Clinical Video Telehealth (CVT) is a true innovation, connecting their best doctors with their neediest patients. Unfortunately, this critical health technology relies on the same network backbone as any Internet service. Who will pay the increased tolls to ensure that serving our veterans remains a priority on these networks?

3. Online education for K–12 students and their teachers

Finally, by 2014, 75% of all US districts offered some form of online education for K–12 students. More than 2.7 million students took advantage of this blended ed-tech, while 315,000 students were enrolled in full-time online education. The same technology you might use in your workplace to hold sales calls is used by teachers to meet with parents and students across the country, delivering education to those who are difficult to serve otherwise. It's annoying when Netflix buffers, but it is tragic when a child can't communicate effectively with his or her teachers.

These are just three of countless examples of how the Internet has come to provide vital services to our veterans, our children, and our communities. Without the basic protections net neutrality affords, these vital services, and so much more, are at risk. Net neutrality advocates are correct to be concerned about the free and unfettered speech of sites across the web if the Internet is left unprotected, but we should not pretend that only our words are at stake. Our safety, our veterans, and our children are on the line, too.

If you're interested in learning more and taking action, take a look at Battle for the Net.

Thank you for your consideration.


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theprawn
7 days ago
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Netflix's Castlevania showrunner also wants to make a 'Dark Metroid' anime

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Now that the Castlevania series has premiered on Netflix and everyone who's interested has gotten their peepers on it, it's time to move forward to the next shiny thing. Showrunner Adi Shankar, fresh off of the announcement he was working on an Assassin's Creed animated assassination, said he'd also be interested in a Metroid series. 

In an interview with Nintendo Life, Shankar said he'd want to tackle a "dark" Metroid series "in the same anime style." Since Metroid seems like a very anime friendly series, I'd be down for it. If it were to take a risk and not have a lot of dialogue (a la Samurai Jack), that'd be absolutely perfect. 

As for the currently in the works Castlevania season 2, Shankar confirms the scripts for the eight episodes have already been written. So, hey, that's a good sign. 

Feature: Castlevania Show Producer Adi Shankar On Respecting Fandom And Future Seasons [Nintendo Life]

Netflix's Castlevania showrunner also wants to make a 'Dark Metroid' anime screenshot

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theprawn
9 days ago
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Oooh
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How We Use the Internet: It’s a Generations Thing

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Was I a web developer in 1998... or just a Pepsi ad? Tune in next week for our exciting conclusion. Brought to you by Pepsi.

This blog post was supposed to be “A Parent’s Guide to Facebook: How to Avoid Embarrassing Your Millennial Kids Online.” So I started by interviewing my 13-year-old son.

When I told him what I was writing about, he looked up from his video game just long enough to smirk and say, “I don’t use Facebook.”

Interview concluded. So much for that story.

Is Facebook Just for Olds?

My son went further, saying Facebook was where old people go to find old people.

“Why would I use Facebook when there are a lot of better ways to chat?” he asked. When I suggested that perhaps he’d have some interest in the newsfeed, he just stared at me, scoffing.

Granted, I am the parent of an introverted, self-proclaimed computer nerd. He’s not necessarily representative of all post-millennials. But I think he’s on to something.

How + Why Generations Use the Internet

Let’s back up a bit.

I am the son of a baby boomer. I am right on the Generation X/millennial line. My youngest coworker's age is exactly in the middle of my and my son’s ages. We’re all online — but ours are barely the same Internets!

Was I a web developer in 1998...or just a Pepsi ad? Tune in next week for our exciting conclusion. Brought to you by Pepsi.

This was my first office job as a web developer, circa 1998 or so. It connected to the Internet with a cable.

The Internet and I grew up together. I was one of the first teens I knew to have the Internet at home.

In those days, the online population was sparse. Knowing someone both online and off was impossibly rare. So those of us who were online built ways to connect. Bulletin boards led to chats and forums, early ancestors of what we would come to call “social networks.”

We were homesteaders. We settled the Wild West, proving the Internet to be neither fad nor toy but rather an essential thing.

The baby boomers followed along, but for a different reason. They had lives, history, friends scattered throughout their states, countries, the world. Social networking was a way to reconnect and reengage like never before. It became a true world forum.

My son, his friends, his generation — they don’t know what it’s like to connect because they’ve never been disconnected. They don’t have a past to reconnect with, either. They don’t need an app to tell them who to be friends with. They already know their friends and will communicate with them on their terms.

So How Does a 13-Year-Old Use the Internet?

Here's a list of my post-millenial's favorite web apps.

The list is his, the postulation is obviously mine, and your mileage may vary. (I'd love to hear your thoughts or experience — connect with me on Snapchat or Twitter.)

Spotify: We all love Spotify in our house; we get every bit of our money's worth on our family package. My wife and I have diverse (even eclectic) taste, with dozens of playlists and artists spanning several decades.

In contrast, my son listens to one genre. He has one playlist of all his favorite EDM tracks, and it’s all in the same decade. (“Sandstorm” is still in that window. I checked.)

Twitter: Just kidding. He doesn’t use Twitter, except to unlock in-game content in certain apps. When those apps force his hand, he complains vigorously — but still does it.

SnapchatWe started our SnapChat streak just for this story. I am famously 9 Clouds slowest writer. But 107 is much cooler than the planned 4-5 day streak, amiright?Snapchat speaks the teen language: See something goofy, say something snarky. My son particularly enjoys documenting pets doing funny things, drawing pictures on my face, snarking about me, and exposing national advertising fails.

Most days start with a snap of his bed head. Whatever keeps the streak going, right?

YouTube: When he isn’t playing video games, my son is watching videos of video games. This is also a good source to find those advertising fails (or other life bloopers) he snaps me.

YouTube is the new “America’s pastime.”

Google: This is where it all begins. Schoolwork, funny pictures, snarky videos, video game hacks. This was the real aha moment for me: kids these days don't go to websites anymore. They go to Google.

The post-millennial generation isn't looking for a home page to replace their newspaper or a newsfeed to tell them what they might like. They don't even think of the Internet in terms of webpages. It's all just content, and they’re looking for the quickest answer right now.

It doesn't matter if it's your $10,000-dollar website, a Wikipedia article, a YouTube video, or a free forum post. The medium doesn’t matter — but whatever it is, it better show up on the first page and answer their question immediately.

As it happens, that's what this dad does for a living.

 


 

We might not be post-millennials here at 9 Clouds, but we know how to talk to them.

Contact us if you have questions about marketing in 2017. We know it's confusing. We're here to help.

The post How We Use the Internet: It’s a Generations Thing appeared first on 9 Clouds.

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theprawn
22 days ago
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Brief thoughts on 3 generations, how and why they use the Internet. And a SnapStreak brag.
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What DAY is it? Mrzyk & Moriceau

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What DAY is it? Mrzyk & Moriceau

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theprawn
24 days ago
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Daily planner for the masses
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Inspo

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We sat down and tried to think of the most inspirational and uplifting words we could bestow upon you all. Ponder on it's meaning and you will unravel wisdom of truly limitless potential.
Follow our instagram account young grasshoppers.

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theprawn
27 days ago
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